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PH 2/1 Pendant, Black Metalized
PH 2/1 Pendant, Black MetalizedPH 2/1 Pendant, Black Metalized
Louis Poulsen PH 2/1 Pendant, Black Metalized
Designed by Poul Henningsen
Item #: LP5741916791
free standard shipping in contiguous USA
$662.00
Quantity:
Availability: Usually ships within 2-3 business days
  • Designer: Poul Henningsen
  • Item #: LP5741916791
  • Availability: Usually ships within 2-3 business days
  • Dimensions: D: 7.9", H: 5.5"
  • Material:
    • LIGHT SOURCE:
      1/40W/G16.5/IF CANDELABRA
    • VOLTAGE: 120V
    • SHADES: Mouth-blown White Opal Glass (Sandblasted on the undersides for uniform light distribution)
    • SUSPENSION: Black Metalized Spun Aluminum
    • MOUNTING:
      Canopy:White
      Cord Type: 3-conductor, 18 AWG White PVC Power Cord
      Cord Length: 12'
  • Care: Surface Wash Only
  • Country: Denmark
  • Poul Henningsen designed the three-shade system during 1925/1926. The first lights using the system were designed for an exhibition in Paris. His work with Louis Poulsen continued until his death in 1967. Throughout his life, PH sought to create glare-free lighting; aiming to direct light where it was most needed, and creating soft shadows while using incandescent bulbs as a light source. The PH 2/1 Pendant is a member of the three-shade family and is one of 19 versions available today. Approximately one thousand models have been produced over the years and consisted of table, floor and wall lamps, as well as a number of chandeliers, which were popular in the 30s for lighting private homes with high ceilings. There were countless combination options. The lights were available in different colors, as well as a range of sizes. The first shades were made of metal with a painted underside, such as white, gold or silver depending on whether diffuse, warm or cold light was desired. Glass was later introduced to the three-shade system. In addition to the downward-directed light, glass lamps illuminated the room. PH was the first person to pursue a scientific approach to light and use the logarithmic spiral as a basis. By using a design based on the logarithmic spiral, he achieved even distribution of light over the entire curve of the shade. This even light distribution, together with the diffuse reflection through the glass, made it possible to control glare and shadow. Each shade reduces the amount of light equally due to their distance from the light source. The PH light model numbers refer to the shade size. Each top shade had a corresponding set of middle and lower shades. In the pure models, such as the 2/2, the top shade has a size of about 20 cm, with corresponding lower shades. The PH 2/1 Pendant consists of an approximately 20 cm top shade, but uses lower shades from the 1/1 model. These hybrid models were introduced due to the desire to hang the pendants at lower heights.
    Poul HenningsenPoul Henningsen (PH) was born in Copenhagen by the famous Danish actress Agnes Henningsen. He never graduated as an architect, but studied at The Technical School at Frederiksberg in Denmark from 1911-14, and then at Technical College in Copenhagen from 1914-17.

    He started practicing traditional functionalistic architecture, but over the years his professional interests changed to focus mainly on lighting which is what he is most famous for. He also expanded his field of occupation into areas of writing, becoming a journalist and an author. For a short period at the beginning of WWII, he was the head architect of the Tivoli Gardens project in Copenhagen. But like many other creative people, he was forced to flee Denmark during the German occupation but soon became a vital part of the Danish colony of artists living in Sweden.

    His lifelong collaboration with Louis Poulsen began in 1925 and lasted until his death in 1967. To this day, Louis Poulsen still benefits from his genius. Poul Henningsen was also the first editor of the company magazine "NYT". The CEO of Louis Poulsen at the time, Sophus Kaastrup-Olsen, gave the magazine to PH as a gift after he had been terminated from another Danish newspaper - his opinions were too radical.

    Poul Henningsen's pioneering work concerning the relationship between light structures, shadows, glare and color reproduction, compared to man's need for light, remains the foundation of the lighting theories still practiced by Louis Poulsen.

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